2018 Spring Courses Brochure Draft



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PRESCRIBED COURSES

: 9 credits
ANTH 2
ANTH 21
ANTH 45

ADDITIONAL COURSES
: 9 credits
Select 3 credits in ANTH courses (excluding ANTH 1)
Select 6 credits in ANTH courses at the 400 level
The minor in Human Development and Family Studies requires a minimum of 18 credits.
PRESCRIBED COURSES
: 3 credits
HDFS 129

ADDITIONAL COURSES
: 15 credits
Select 15 credits in HDFS courses (at least 6 credits at the 400 level)
The minor in Psychology requires a minimum of 18 credits.
PRESCRIBED COURSES
: 7 credits
PSYCH 100
PSYCH 301

ADDITIONAL COURSES
: 11 credits
Select 11 credits in PSYCH courses (at least 6 credits at the 400 level)
The minor in Sociology requires a minimum of 18 credits.
PRESCRIBED COURSES
: 3 credits
SOC 1

ADDITIONAL COURSES
: 15 credits

Select 15 credits in SOC courses (at least 6 credits at the 400 level)




NOTE: Students must receive a C or better for courses to satisfy minor requirements.



ANTH 021: Introductory Biological Anthropology
ANTH 045: Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 448: Ethnography of the United States
ANTH 476: Anthropology of Gender
HDFS 229: Infant and Child Development
HDFS 239: Adolescent Development
HDFS 301: Values and Ethics in Health and Human Development Professions
HDFS 315: Family Development
HDFS 429: Advanced Child Development
PSYCH 100: Introductory Psychology
PSYCH 200: Elementary Statistics in Psychology
PSYCH 212: Introduction to Developmental Psychology
PSYCH 221: Introduction to Social Psychology
PSYCH 256: Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
PSYCH 301: Basic Research Methods in Psychology (W)
PSYCH 422: Human Sexuality
PSYCH 434: Psychology of Gaming
PSYCH 452: Learning and Memory
PSYCH 470: Abnormal Psychology
PSYCH 478: Clinical Neuropsychology
PSYCH 494: Senior Thesis Independent Study
PSYCH 495: Internship

PSYCH 499: Social Science Gaming in Scotland

SOC 001: Introductory Sociology
SOC 005: Social Problems
SOC 012: Criminology
SOC 030: Sociology of the Family
SOC 110: Sociology of Gender
SOC 119: Race and Ethnic Relations
SOC 451: Health, Disease, & Society
SOC 454: The City in Post-Industrial Society (Urban Sociology)
SOC 477: Sociology of Sexuality



Dr. Peter Capelotti
TTh, 9:05am – 10:20am (Section 01)
TTh, 10:35am – 11:50am (Section 02)
1/8 – 4/27
Biological anthropology explores the evolutionary biology of humankind based on data excavated from the fossil record and studies of the human skeleton, as well as studies of the genetics of individuals, populations, and non-human primates, along with studies of human behavior and adaptation. By the end of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss core discoveries in the human fossil record; to the discovery of the age of both the
Earth and the human presence upon it; and to the revolution in human thought brought about by Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin, and the conflicts between Darwinism and the Bible. As such, the course prepares students for further work in anthropology, biology, and challenges them to think about their place in human history.
Dr. Neri de Kramer
MW, 8:00am – 9:15am (Section 01)
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am (Section 02)

1/8 – 4/27

Cultural anthropology is the study of human cultural variation across time and in global context. In this course, students will explore a broad range of concepts including culture and culture change, anthropological research methods, language, belief systems, political systems, family and marriage, and differences and inequalities of race, class, and gender.
The purpose of the course is to become acquainted with these and other central concepts of cultural anthropology and to gain insights into how they explain and inform students’ daily lives and experiences.
Dr. Peter Capelotti
TTh and Web, 8:00am – 8:50am
1/8 – 4/27
This seminar will use the example of the international race to the North Pole to examine the ways in which the expansion of American culture has created a uniquely American archaeological signature written on the global landscape, and how the cultural history of the nation can be read from transformative events such as the exploration of the Polar
Regions.



Dr. Neri de Kramer
F, 8:00am – 11:00am
1/8 – 4/27
In this course, students will explore the cultural and social reproduction of gender and gender ideologies, the fluidity of gender categories, gender inequality, and the performative aspects of gender. The course will provide students with ways to understand how we come to consider and express ourselves as "men," "women," or someone other to those categories, and what these processes look like in other parts of the world. The course also considers the complexities and dilemmas posed by the intersecting subjectivities of race, ethnicity, and social class, and discussions of the contribution that the anthropological study of gender can make to society.


Dr. Judith Newman
TTh, 3:05pm – 4:20pm
1/8 – 4/27
We will focus on the child from the moment of conception to approximately 12 years of age. We will examine theory and research concerning development as it occurs in several domains: physical, motor, personality, social, intellectual, language, etc. The course will consist mostly of lectures, discussions, and films which relate to the material in the textbook as well as issues of current concern regarding children.
Dr. Vivian Hsu
TTh, 9:05am – 10:20am
1/8 – 4/27
Being a teenager today is significantly different from being a teenager in our parent’s time.
This course will provide us with further insight as to the growing changes that influence adolescence today, including the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional turbulence. We will be concentrating on the time period spanning from late childhood through adulthood and the individual experiences that are influenced by our early infancy and childhood. The approach will emphasize recent research relevant to present day society. This is a psychology course that is designed for all undergraduates who are interested in learning about basic biological/cognitive/emotional/social development throughout adolescence.
There are no pre-requisites for this course; however, Introductory Psychology (PSYCH 100) or Developmental Psychology (PSYCH 212) are recommended.
Dr. Judith Newman
TTh, 1:35pm – 2:50pm
1/8 – 4/27

This course will acquaint you with some frameworks for ethical decision-making in dilemmas commonly faced by mental health professionals. Whereas the focus will be mostly on ethical conduct in the relationship between therapist and client, especially as concerns the principles and guidelines formulated by national professional associations, we will also consider ethical issues for the researcher in the psychological and social sciences and for other mental/behavioral health professionals working in various domains (e.g., schools, courts, etc.).



Dr. Judith Newman
TTh, 12:05pm – 1:20pm
1/8 – 4/27
We will focus on the development of families as they move through their own life cycles (i.e., from cohabitation and possibly to childbearing/childrearing), and finally to the death of one or both members of the original couple. We will look at the inner dynamics of marital relationships, the interactions between parent and child across the lifespan, "dysfunctions" within the family, and alternative family forms. The course will consist mostly of lectures, discussions, and films which relate to but do not completely overlap with material in the textbook.
Dr. Vivian Hsu
M, 8:00am – 11:00am
1/8 – 4/27
Breastmilk or Formula? Feberize or Cry It Out? Baby Einstein or LeapFrog? What do I do to ensure that my baby is going to grow up to be a happy and productive child? This course will provide you with an in-depth view of child development in the age of technology and cultural advancements. We will expand our focus as we dive into issues that influence the education of our children today, such as Common Core and gender identity. The approach will emphasize recent research relevant to present day society. This course is designed for all undergraduates who are interested in a seminar formatted course where discussion regarding past and current research will be the main focus as well dispelling common myths and misconceptions related to growing up today. The pre-requisite for this course is Infant and Child Development (HDFS 229).


Dr. Julie Liebman
MWF, 10:10am – 11:00am (Section 01)
MWF, 11:15am – 12:05am (Section 02)

1/8 – 4/27

This course provides an overview of the field of psychology, including research, theory, and application. Specific topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, development, social cognition and social influence, personality and individual differences, and mental disorders and therapy.
A primary goal of the course is to show how questions within these areas are addressed through empirical research.
Dr. Meghan Gillen
TTh, 10:35am – 11:50am
1/8 – 4/27
This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of psychology. We will discuss theory and scientific findings from multiple areas in this field. Specific topics to be covered include the brain and behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, human development, gender, learning, motivation, romantic relationships, emotion, social behavior, sexuality, personality, psychological disorders, health, and careers in psychology. Methods of learning will include readings, lectures, iClicker technology, and films. Although the majority of class time will be devoted to lecture, students are encouraged to pose scholarly questions and comments. This is a survey course designed for students interested in learning about the field of psychology. There are no pre-requisites for this course.
Dr. LaShonda Burley
M, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
1/8 – 4/27

This course provides an overview of the field of psychology, including research, theory, and application. Specific topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, development, social cognition and social influence, personality and individual differences, and mental disorders and therapy.

A primary goal of the course is to show how questions within these areas are addressed through empirical research.



Dr. Russell Webster
MWF, 1:00pm – 2:15pm (Section 01)
MWF, 2:30pm – 3:45pm (Section 02)
1/8 – 4/27
Every day you are bombarded with “scientific” findings and are being told by your mom,
BFF, or a random Tweet to try something new to stay smart, healthy, etc. Statistics is an integral part of making conclusions about every study, and thus a necessary tool to understand research. You’ve heard the rumors: “Stats is hard.” Yes, this class is challenging.
But I am here to help you tame the lion that is statistics; and, you will tame it. Being armed with the skills to critically evaluate how researchers analyze their data will make you a smarter, sassier consumer. In sum, this course will primarily focus on you mastering




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