2018 Spring Courses Brochure Draft



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conceptual

understanding and the
application
of statistical knowledge (i.e., with less emphasis on mathematical formulas) so that (a) you are ready for the second course in our sequence (PSYCH 301W), and (b) you may be able to later exploit your knowledge to be more competitive in obtaining employment or in applying to graduate school.
Dr. Julie Liebman
MWF, 1:25pm – 2:15pm
1/8 – 4/27
Developmental psychology involves the scientific study of the social, emotional, and intellectual changes that enable progression from infancy to adulthood. This course provides an overview of the field of developmental psychology, including its history, research methodologies, theories, and applications. Specific topics include the biological bases of development, parent-infant attachment, the development of sensation and perception, cognition and linguistic development, emotional development, moral development, stereotype development, childhood and adolescent psychopathology and its development.
Dr. Lawrence Barbera
W, 5:00pm – 8:00pm
1/8 – 4/27

Developmental psychology involves the scientific study of the social, emotional, and intellectual changes that enable progression from infancy to adulthood. This course provides an overview of the field of developmental psychology, including its history, research methodologies, theories, and applications. Specific topics include the biological bases of development, parent-infant attachment, the development of sensation and perception, cognition and linguistic development, emotional development, moral development, stereotype development, childhood and adolescent psychopathology and its development.



Dr. Michael Bernstein
M and Web, 11:15am – 12:30pm (Section 01)
W and Web, 11:15am – 12:30pm (Section 02)
1/8 – 4/27
Social psychology is the study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced far more by the situations, environments, and people around them than they think they are and even by their own personalities. We think that the reason why people behave the way they do is because "that's the type of person they are," but often times, factors beyond the person cause people to behave in various ways. In this class, we will cover myriad topics including aggression, intergroup relations, stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, liking, loving, close relationships, leaderships, and a host of others. We'll discuss seminal work showing that ordinary people can be both led to supposedly kill another due to the power of the situation as well as sit still in a room on fire and not move a muscle to leave—all because of the situation. The course is a hybrid course, meaning lectures are watched online and class time is devoted to answering questions, class discussion and activities. Exams are open book/note and homeworks are submitted online.
Dr. Vivian Hsu
TTh, 10:35am – 11:50am
1/8 – 4/27

Have the following questions ever crossed your mind: Why did I do that and what was I thinking? Well, this course, Introduction to Cognitive Psychology will help to provide answers to some of those questions. We will focus on the psychological basis for the understanding of human behavior as a result of cognitive processes which influence things like perception, misconceptions, attention and memory. Additionally, we will gain a further understanding of these processes through animal and human experiments. The approach will emphasize recent research relevant to present day society. We will focus on a number of different areas: (1) theories pertaining to cognitive development, (2) underlying processes in areas of brain and behavior connectedness, (3) the role of environment on development, and (4) critical applications of present day research. It is absolutely crucial that you have a basic understand of psychological processes prior to enrolling in this course. Therefore, to succeed in this course you must have at least the PSYCH100 prerequisite. Students who do not have the pre-req, must receive prior permission from instructor to continue with the course.



Dr. Gayle Schwark
MWF, 11:00am – 12:15pm (Section 02)
MWF, 1:00pm – 2:15pm (Section 01)
1/8 – 4/27
Basic Research Methods in Psychology is an introduction to the methodology used in psychological research, with an emphasis on quantitative methods. Students will learn how to interpret, design, and conduct basic psychological research, conduct scientific literature reviews using library and other resources, think critically about scientific research, and identify appropriate methodologies and statistical tests to answer questions related to social sciences. This is a hands-on course. As such, students will apply what they learn in order to conduct two research projects over the course of the semester and communicate their findings in APA style research papers. Prerequisites for this course include Introductory Psychology
(PSYCH 100) and an introductory course in Statistics (PSYCH 200 or STAT 200).
Dr. Russell Webster
Th, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
1/8 – 4/27
As Salt-N-Pepa (1990) so eloquently put it:
“What we have here is subject to controversy;
A three-letter word some regard as a curse, see…
Let’s talk about sex….
Let's talk about all the good things,
And the bad things that may be….
Let's tell it how it is, and how it could be.
How it was, and of course, how it should be….”
As this is a 400-level course, I will treat this class like a seminar. That is, this class will focus
less
on acquiring/testing fundamental knowledge about human sexuality (like 200- or

300-level course), although you (and I) will likely learn new information about human sexuality. Rather, the course will focus

more
on critically thinking about specific and relevant empirical questions regarding human sexuality from a psychological science perspective (in reading primary and secondary research). We will tackle such questions as: Is being gay a choice? Do homophobic people harbor same-sex attractions? Is BDSM pathological? Is hooking-up psychologically harmful? Does consuming porn lead to sexual violence? Ideally, by the end of the course, you will be a smarter, sassier consumer of info on human sexuality.



Dr. Jacob A. Benfield
F, 2:30pm – 5:30pm
1/8 – 4/27
Gaming as a leisure activity has a long history and represents a vast domain of types, genres, and playing styles. This course will examine the behavioral and cognitive antecedents and consequences of game play, development, and marketing. By incorporating both low-technology games and cutting-edge electronics into a single course, students will gain a better understanding of underlying game elements that make for more fun, better social outcomes, and the potential for applying game theory to other contexts.
Dr. Vivian Hsu
TTh, 12:05pm – 1:20pm
1/8 – 4/27

What would happen if we could never remember anything else? Would our lives continue or cease to be meaningful? We will ask these questions and more in PSYCH 452 Learning and Memory. This course will provide you with an overview of learning and memory studies in psychology. We will concentrate on understanding human behavior through different learning processes such as perceptual learning, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and imitation. These processes will then be further investigated to understand their connections to memory development both in the human and animal models. The approach will emphasize recent research relevant to present day society. It is absolutely crucial that you have a basic understand of psychological processes of learning prior to enrolling in this course. Therefore, to succeed in this course you must have at least taken PSYCH 100 and

PSYCH 256.
Dr. LaShonda Burley
Th, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
1/8 – 4/27
This course focuses on some of the topics and questions people most commonly ask about psychology: What are the different psychological disorders, and what are they like? How do clinicians diagnose someone with a disorder? What do therapists actually do in therapy?
Course objectives include: (a) examining historical and current conceptions of normal and abnormal behavior; (b) surveying the origins, symptoms, and characteristics of several adult psychological disorders; and (c) investigating the main treatment approaches for psychological disorders.



Dr. Julie Liebman
MWF, 2:30pm – 3:20pm
1/8 – 4/27
Neuropsychology is an area of psychology where the overall focus is the scientific study of behavior and experience, and underlying associated neurological and physiological processes. This course provides an overview of the biological bases of behavior and includes a presentation of the research, theory, and application of this knowledge. Specific topics include the basic anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous system, neural transmission and the function of various neurotransmitters. The majority of the course will focus on how these contribute to the processing of information from the senses, simple and complex learning, and cognitive functions such as memory, and language. Topics will include brain development, developmental and acquired neuropsychological disorders and therapeutic techniques.
Dr. Meghan Gillen
TTh, 9:05am – 10:20am

1/8 – 4/27

This course provides hands-on experience with the entire research process. It begins with idea development and continues through the communication of results to the public and/or discipline. This course requires students to perform the duties of a professional researcher within his or her discipline under the supervision and direction of a faculty member, but also places a great deal of autonomy in the hands of the student. As such, students should have completed the majority of their coursework prior to taking this course and should treat the course as a culmination of their training.
Dr. Gayle Schwark
Day and time arranged by appointment
1/8 – 4/27
The internship course is the academic component of the internship experience required of all PSS majors. Students will gain pre-professional experience in the field of psychology in order to explore career options in this field and to learn how theory and classroom learning is applied in real-world settings. Students will also develop and sharpen the skills needed to work in a professional setting. In addition, this upper-level course is intended to help students integrate the diverse theory and research they have been learning through the PSS program curriculum. [




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