A research brief


Old age is conventionally thought of as 65



Download 107,73 Kb.
View original pdf
Page2/12
Date02.10.2019
Size107,73 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12
Old age is conventionally thought of as 65

years of age and older.
Example:
Timiras’
Physiological Basis of Aging and
Geriatrics (2007) describes common terms related to aging and methods in its first chapter. She states, “Old age in humans is conventionally accepted as the stage in the life cycle that beings at around 65 years of age and terminates with death” (Timiras 2007, 4).
No single theory or mechanism to explain
aging has emerged. Rather it seems to be a
result of multiple causes.
Example:
Taylor and Johnson’s
Physiology of Exercise and Healthy Aging discusses theories of aging: “To date, no one theory has found acceptance by the scientific community…we suggest that, in all likelihood, aging is not caused by any single factor but is due to an aggregate of causes” (Taylor and Johnson 2007, xxiv).
Old age is characterized by prevalence of
multiple and chronic diseases.
Example:
According to Timiras’ (2007)
Physiological

Basis of Aging and Geriatrics, “One of the main characteristics of old age pathology is comorbidity, that is, the multiplicity of diseases simultaneously affecting the same individual…Another characteristic of the elderly is that diseases tend to be chronic and debilitating rather than acute and self-limiting; symptoms tend to be more subtle and vague” (Timiras 2007, 33).


Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12


The database is protected by copyright ©psysite.info 2019
send message

    Main page